Publications

Tunisia’s “Transition”: Between Revolution and Globalized National Security

PDF downlaodCorinna Mullin*

POMEAS PAPER No.8, September 2015 

Recent events have called into question Tunisia’s status as the “model” Arab uprising state in contrast to the “failed states” and/or “persistent authoritarianism” elsewhere in the region.1 Most analyses still begin with reference to the country’s two largely successful rounds of elections, the adoption of a widely praised constitution, and the opening up of the political and public spheres to participation by broader segments of Tunisian society. However, many now also point to the recent upsurge in political violence as a potential foil to Tunisia’s otherwise smooth progression.2 Among the tragic incidences cited are the two political assassinations in 2013, sporadic attacks on military personnel in the mountainous regions in the west of the country, and the deadly attacks on foreign tourists at the Bardo national museum and, most recently, on the Sousse beach resort.

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Malaysia and the Arab Spring

PDF downlaodBülent Aras* and Sinan Ekim**

POMEAS PAPER No.7, July 2015 

In one of his first speeches in the aftermath of the Arab Spring, delivered to the Malay Student Association at Oxford University on 17 May 2011, the Prime Minister Najib Razak propagated “justly balanced moderation.”1 As he would do in every public statement, he underlined “diversity, dialogue, and peaceful co-existence” as the prevalent teachings of the Quran, which Malaysia purportedly upheld. Najib also referred to “inclusivity and diversity” as the key tenets of Malaysia’s approach to international relations - an allusion to his infamous 1Malaysia policy, which called upon the government agencies and civil servants to “more strongly emphasize ethnic harmony and national unity.”2

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Indonesia and the Arab Spring

PDF downlaodBülent Aras* and Sinan Ekim**

POMEAS PAPER No.6, May 2015 

Introduction
As the Arab Spring sent shockwaves across North Africa, the Western governments reached out to Indonesia for guidance, viewing the country with the largest Muslim population as an ideal model for the “Arab Spring” countries. The Obama administration turned to Jakarta to make sense of the events raging across the region, and to forge a trajectory of change that would bring these countries to where Indonesia had ended up. Indeed, it was the conviction of many, including the then US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, that the uprisings echoed what had transpired in Indonesia in the 1990s, when the country transformed itself from a dictatorship under Suharto into a functioning democracy.1

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Pakistan and the Arab Spring: No Scenario for Muslim Cooperation

PDF downlaodBülent Aras* and Sinan Ekim**

POMEAS PAPER No.5, April 2015 

In January 2011, the Arab World appeared in flux. Bouazizi's self-immolation on 17 December 2010 had unleashed a myriad trend of social tumults, and sent shockwaves across the region. In return, the external actors had to adjust to the new Arab World that was unfolding at their doorstep. Like their counterparts in the United States, the European Union, and almost every country that formed a part of the international community, the Pakistani authorities battled with the same set of complications: what if the Middle East and North Africa evolved into a system of regional relations less compatible, or diametrically at odds, with Pakistan's preferences?

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India’s Dilemma in the Arab Spring

PDF downlaodBülent Aras*,Elif Gizem Demirağ** and Mona Sachter***

POMEAS PAPER No 4., February 2015 

Abstract

How can India's reactions to the Arab Spring be explained? Why did India react differently to the Libyan and Syrian cases? How do India's responses justify its aspiration to take an active role in an emerging multilateral international order? This paper attempts to answer these questions by analyzing India's major interests in the MENA region. India's voting behavior vis-à-vis the UN resolutions during its Security Council tenure offers a critical empirical baseline supporting this analysis. The paper highlights that India's traditional foreign policy based on the non-alignment and non-interventionist principles have been driven by its economy, energy and diaspora-related interests towards the MENA region. The Arab Spring created a dilemma for India in its foreign policy making and a partial deviation from the traditional foreign policy approach, especially in multilateral platforms. Despite these challenges, this paper argues that India successfully resisted the wave of the Arab Spring.

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Israel’s 50 Day Attack on Gaza

PDF downlaodRichard Falk*

POMEAS PAPER No.3, November 2014

 

Abstract
This paper holds an exploratory approach for explaining the latest developments took place between Israel and Palestine following the heavy attack launched by Israel starting from July 8th this year. The one- sided Israeli attack was the third on Gaza within less than six years. It was carried under the name of Operation Protective Edge and lasted 50 days leaving hundreds of casualties, thousands of injuries and heavy traumas behind. In the light of these developments, this paper aims to provide a comprehensive picture of the 50-day-long attack and its aftermath.

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Turkey as a "Humanitarian State"

 

 

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  E. Fuat Keyman* and Onur Sazak**
  POMEAS PAPER No.2, July 2014

The global power shift that started over a decade ago has taken a most curious turn in recent years with the decadence of great power politics and the rise of new contenders. The multiple crises of globalization are imminent on international system. These multiple crises entail a nearly synchronistic eruption of the following international conundrums: 1) a global economic crisis that consists of a financial crisis, global recession and unemployment; 2) a crisis of hegemony and power that comes about with lack of leadership, multipolarity, a deluge within Western modernity and the emergence of multiple, alternative modernities; 3) the crisis of civilization accompanied by global climate change, energy scarcity, depleting food resources, and eroding global social justice with skyrocketing rates of poverty, uneven and "uncompassionate" development, and inequality. 

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Military Coup, Elections, and Authoritarian Survival in Egypt

 

 

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  Bülent Aras*
  POMEAS PAPER No.1, June 2014

Not a year has passed since the coup d'etat in July 2013, which ended the rule of the only civilian leader in Egyptian politics; Mohammed Morsi. The military takeover has culminated in mass protests and unrest which resulted more than 3000 casualties. The recent victory of the new president, the formal general Abdel Fattah Sisi in June 2014 is built on a transition rule of systematic oppression and restriction of fundamental freedoms.

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